States with the most hailstorms

Stacker compiled a list of states with the most hailstorms from 2012-2021 using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association data.

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Large balls of hail on the ground.

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Hailstorms are caused when updrafts in a thunderstorm carry water to high altitudes, where the water freezes into pellets, eventually becoming so heavy that they fall to Earth. They can occur from May through September, but are most common during spring months. The ice rocks aren't just a bother, but can cause an economic disaster: In some parts of the country, hail damage costs billions, impacting homes, businesses, and vehicles.

There are easy ways to prepare for a hailstorm. If a hailstorm occurs while driving, immediately find shelter under an overpass, gas station, or another roofed area. At home, stay inside and wait out the storm. Hailstorms generally don't cause human casualties, but it's better to be safe and stay inside if possible. When it's over, inspect roofs and windows for damage and leaks, and check vehicles for dents or broken glass before going inside.

Some states have weather patterns and geography that are much more conducive to hailstorms. Others not so much. Good news for Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Maryland, Oregon, and Rhode Island residents: No significant hailstorms have hit these states in recent years, so they've been omitted from this list. Stacker compiled a list of states with the most hailstorms from 2012-2021 using data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association.

Stacker only counted hailstorms that caused property damage to provide the best look at which states suffer extreme hail events and which are spared. Stacker also identified the hail event which caused the most damage in each state in the past 10 years and pulled in NOAA's descriptions of that event to give you an idea of the destruction that hailstorms can leave in their wake.

Read on to find out where hailstorms cause the most damage—and may all cars and roofs be spared.

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#44. New Hampshire

Hail crashes down onto the top of a car.

Ben Romalis // Shutterstock

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 2
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $12,000 (#8 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $0.09 per 100 residents. (#9 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2014 storm in Hillsborough ($10,000 in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: An upper-level disturbance moved through Southern New England, igniting showers and thunderstorms across the area. Many of these storms produced small to large size hail thanks to very cold temperatures aloft.

#43. Massachusetts

Pixabay

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 2
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $3.0 million (#19 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $4.30 per 100 residents. (#17 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2013 storm in Hampden ($3.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: An upper-level disturbance moved across southern New England, igniting showers and thunderstorms. A cold pool aloft allowed for steep mid-level lapse rates as well as temperatures cold enough for large hail. Storms were isolated but produced damaging winds in northern Connecticut and up to half dollar size hail in southwestern Massachusetts.

#42. Maine

Suzanne Tucker // Shutterstock

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 2
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $1.2 million (#16 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $8.74 per 100 residents. (#21 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2016 storm in Aroostook ($1.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: An isolated severe thunderstorm moved across northeast Aroostook County during the early morning hours of the 11th in advance of a cold front. The storm produced large hail, which dented vehicles and broke windows in the Caribou area. Hundreds of vehicles received varying degrees of hail damage. Hail damage to vehicles in the Caribou area was estimated at around $1 million.

#41. Connecticut

Pixabay

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 2
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $75,000 (#11 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $0.21 per 100 residents. (#10 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2018 storm in Hartford ($70,000 in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A cold front over the Great Lakes moved through Southern New England during the late afternoon and early night of May 15th. The air mass over Connecticut was very warm and humid, and as the cold front moved into this air it generated numerous thunderstorms. Some thunderstorms produced damaging wind gusts, large hail, and heavy downpours.

#40. Alabama

phatman // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 3
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $15,500 (#9 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $0.03 per 100 residents. (#8 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2014 storm in Mobile ($10,000 in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A strong storm system brought record flooding along with severe thunderstorms that produced damaging winds and tornadoes to the region.

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#39. New Jersey

Suzanne Tucker // Shutterstock

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 4
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $11,000 (#7 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $0.01 per 100 residents. (#7 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Ocean ($5,000 in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: Scattered strong to severe thunderstorms developed along a sea breeze front and also ahead of an approaching cold front, producing pockets of very heavy rain and some wind damage across parts of New Jersey, eastern Pennsylvania, and Delaware during the afternoon and evening of the 22nd. One of the hardest hit areas was Cumberland and Salem Counties, where power was out in some locations until the 24th. Atlantic City Electric reported that roughly 16,000 of its customers lost power at the height of the storm.

#38. Wyoming

Sarah-Rose // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 7
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $32,750 (#10 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $0.57 per 100 residents. (#15 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2013 storm in Campbell ($10.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A supercell thunderstorm moved southeastward across southern Campbell County, producing large hail and strong wind gusts. Extensive hail damage occurred in Wright, with many homes and vehicles affected, with the Noonan and Casner subdivisions receiving the most damage. Heavy rain flooded low-lying areas in and around town.

#37. Florida

Pixabay

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 9
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $791,800 (#15 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $0.36 per 100 residents. (#11 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2013 storm in Leon ($720,000 in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A series of upper-level disturbances rotating around a mean longwave trough west of the area brought copious amounts of moisture into the area. The KTAE rawinsonde sounding on the evening of Feb. 22 measured a PWAT value of 1.77 inches, which was the second-highest PWAT observed during the month of February at that location. Rainfall amounts generally between 9 and 14 inches were observed during the five-day period between Feb. 22-26 across the Tallahassee area with similar amounts across the remainder of the Florida Panhandle. This led to areas of flooding. There were also some severe storms during the early morning hours of Feb. 26. The southeast big bend saw significantly less rainfall.

#36. Utah

Craig & Estelle McKay // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 11
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $179,000 (#12 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $0.54 per 100 residents. (#14 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2013 storm in Uintah ($30,000 in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: The weather pattern of high pressure over the Southeast states and an upper trough along the West Coast allowed another surge of monsoonal moisture to move into eastern Utah. Cooling temperatures aloft allowed large hail to form in some of the stronger storms, while heavy rain and some flash flooding also occurred.

#35. Nevada

Picadilly Pink // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 13
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $105.6 million (#9 highest)
- Annual property damage: $335.79 per 100 residents. (#9 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Clark ($50.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A strong push of monsoon moisture fueled a five-day outbreak of thunderstorms over the Mojave Desert and southern Great Basin. Numerous storms produced flash flooding and/or severe weather.

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#34. Wisconsin

fivedollarones // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 16
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $237,000 (#13 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $0.40 per 100 residents. (#12 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2020 storm in La Crosse ($45.5 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: Severe storms rolled across western Wisconsin during the late afternoon and evening of June 2. Some of these storms produced very large hail ranging in size from 1 inch up to 2.5 inches in diameter. One of the hardest hit areas by the hail was Holmen (La Crosse County) where it was estimated that between 4,000 and 5,000 homes would need new roofs. Up to golf ball-sized hail also fell near Pray (Jackson County) and near Dodge (Buffalo County). The storms also produced damaging winds with trees blown down across parts of Jackson, Monroe, Vernon, Adams, and Juneau Counties. In Tomah (Monroe County), the roof canopy was blown off a grandstand at the county fairgrounds. The metal siding was ripped off a grain mill southeast of Ontario (Vernon County). More than 6,600 customers in the La Crosse area (La Crosse County) were without power after the storms moved through.

#33. Arizona

Pixabay

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 18
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $5.1 million (#23 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $7.03 per 100 residents. (#20 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2015 storm in Pima ($2.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: High pressure resided over southern Utah/northern Arizona with weak low pressure over west Texas. This created strong easterly flow over southeast Arizona, which increased to 25-30 kts. Thunderstorms produced large hail and damaging winds across Santa Cruz and Pima counties, including Tucson.

#32. Idaho

Steve White // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 25
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $30.8 million (#16 highest)
- Annual property damage: $161.86 per 100 residents. (#11 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2018 storm in Bonneville ($29.8 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A powerful storm created funnel clouds, a tornado, and extremely large hail the early evening of April 7. Hail up to 2 inches in the Idaho Falls area and funnel clouds and a touchdown in Bingham County.

#31. Tennessee

vanerpaddel // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 26
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $25.4 million (#17 highest)
- Annual property damage: $36.34 per 100 residents. (#19 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Davidson ($25.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: On Friday, March 2, as a warm and moist surface-based air mass occurred across middle Tennessee in advance of a strong surface cold front, and a deep upper-level trough moved closer to the mid-state with strong winds aloft, a significant severe weather outbreak occurred across the mid-state starting in the morning hours and lasting well into the evening hours. Multiple reports of large hail occurred across the area, with sizes ranging from penny to baseball size. Several locations reported thunderstorm wind damage. Two tornadoes, an EF1 and EF2 respectively, occurred across the mid-state with some funnel clouds also being reported.

#30. Montana

Pixabay

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 28
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $1.8 million (#17 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $16.59 per 100 residents. (#24 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2016 storm in Fallon ($1.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: Another strong upper-level disturbance combined with unstable conditions at the surface resulted in a round of severe thunderstorms across Fallon County in the Billings Forecast Area during the afternoon of the 6th. Large hail and funnel clouds along with multiple small spin-up tornadoes were reported with these thunderstorms.

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#29. Indiana

Ben Romalis // Shutterstock

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 30
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $3.8 million (#22 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $5.65 per 100 residents. (#19 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Gibson ($3.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: Supercells developed and moved across southwest Indiana. The supercells raced east-northeast at 50-60 mph as a strong storm system moved northeast from Oklahoma to lower Michigan with its associated cold front sweeping east across the Ohio and Tennessee valleys. Strong wind shear with the storm system combined with warm, moist and unstable air provided the fuel for supercell thunderstorms.

#28. West Virginia

Pixabay

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 33
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $3.1 million (#20 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $17.16 per 100 residents. (#23 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2016 storm in Taylor ($3.8 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: An east-to-west front had lifted north into southern Ohio and northern West Virginia during the day. By mid-afternoon, the front was south of Columbus, Ohio, to near the Mason-Dixon Line around Morgantown. More clouds and cooler temperatures lingered north of the boundary. In southern Ohio and western West Virginia, more sunshine allowed for warmer temperatures and increased instability during the afternoon. Temperatures had warmed to the mid- and upper 70s with dew points in the lower 60s. Thunderstorms formed during the mid-afternoon and moved east. One long lived cell came across the Ohio River and into Wood County producing large hail. Another cell on the southern edge of a larger cluster of showers and thunderstorms pulsed to stronger levels as it moved into Taylor County. In a narrow corridor in Taylor County, golf ball- to tennis ball-size hail was observed. The largest hail stones were the size of baseballs. Considerable damage was done around Grafton.

#27. Illinois

Nick Olejniczak // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 37
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $118.5 million (#8 highest)
- Annual property damage: $93.49 per 100 residents. (#15 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2014 storm in Douglas ($100.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A cold front interacted with a warm and humid airmass to produce clusters of severe thunderstorms during the late afternoon and evening of May 21. Most of the storms were concentrated in a corridor from far southeastern McLean and northern Piatt counties southeastward across Champaign, Vermilion, northern Douglas, and northern Edgar counties. Very large hail up to the size of grapefruits was reported near Tuscola in Douglas County. In addition, thunderstorm cells repeatedly training over the same locations produced flash flooding in two narrow corridors across east central Illinois.

#26. Colorado

Hiroaki Protagonist // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 38
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $1.2 billion (#2 highest)
- Annual property damage: $1,987.64 per 100 residents. (#2 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2018 storm in Arapahoe ($276.4 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: Very large hail, up to 3 inches in diameter, pummeled portions of the Front Range Urban Corridor and extended across the northeast plains of Colorado. Reports of collapsed roofs due to hail were reported, with major hail damage across northern portions of the Denver metro area. The Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association estimated the property damage from the storm totaled $276.4 million, making it the 8th costliest hailstorm to strike the state to date. Frontage roads along Interstate 76 northeast of Denver were also flooded and washed out. In Lincoln County, large hail in the Arriba and Genoa areas damaged vehicles along Interstate 70. A total of four short-lived tornadoes touched down in the open country of Lincoln and Weld counties. Thunderstorms in Lincoln County also produced damaging wind gusts up to 70 mph.

#25. Virginia

Alpha // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 46
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $13.4 million (#22 highest)
- Annual property damage: $15.56 per 100 residents. (#26 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Roanoke ($1.3 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A broad, weak upper trough persisted across the eastern U.S., a continuation of the pattern from late July. With a very moist, unstable air mass present across the region and the presence of the upper trough, scattered to numerous thunderstorms developed during the afternoon and persisted even past midnight. The storms generally progressed from the southern Shenandoah Valley area of Virginia to Roanoke and south central Virginia during the late afternoon/evening. Then, around 10 pm EDT, a new area of thunderstorms developed in northwest North Carolina, which also quickly became severe. The main event from all of these thunderstorms was severe hail, namely quarter-sized or larger. The Roanoke area was particularly hard hit when a supercell drifted across the city from northeast to southwest. Isolated thunderstorm wind events were also reported.

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#24. Kentucky

1SarahSmith // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 47
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $6.5 million (#24 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $14.39 per 100 residents. (#25 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Wolfe ($2.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: During the afternoon and evening hours of March 2, a historic tornado outbreak occurred in eastern Kentucky. Tornadoes struck Menifee, Morgan, Bath, Wolfe, Laurel, Johnson, and Martin Counties causing a combined 16 deaths in those counties. The hardest hit areas were West Liberty in Morgan County, Salyersville in Magoffin County, and East Bernstadt in Laurel County. One of the strongest tornadoes in this outbreak, rated at EF-3 with winds estimated at 140 mph, caused extensive damage in Menifee and Morgan counties. This tornado killed two people in Menifee county and took an additional six lives in Morgan County. The town of West Liberty was particularly hard hit, with every building in the downtown area suffering some degree of damage. Several homes were swept off their foundations. A second EF-3 tornado touched down in extreme southeast Wolfe County and cut a path of damage across portions of Magoffin, Johnson, and Martin Counties. This twister was at its most intense strength in Magoffin and Johnson counties, with winds estimated at 160 mph. This tornado caused catastrophic damage in parts of Salyersville. This second tornado killed two people in Johnson County. A third strong tornado caused extensive damage in and near the community of East Bernstadt in Laurel County. This tornado was rated at EF-2 and caused six fatalities. Most of these deaths occurred when several trailer homes were picked up and destroyed by the tornado. An EF-1 tornado was also confirmed in Bath County. This tornado caused extensive damage to trees, farm buildings, and residences along its track. Fortunately, no deaths or injuries occurred as a result of this tornado. The storms that occurred on March 2 also produced very large hail. Reports were received of hailstones as big as baseballs. Extensive damage to trees and structures due to thunderstorm wind gusts also occurred. To top it all off, the heavy rain produced by the large and powerful thunderstorms lead to flash flooding in several counties where tornadoes also occurred.

#23. California

Mitch Barrie // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 48
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $20.4 million (#18 highest)
- Annual property damage: $5.21 per 100 residents. (#18 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2017 storm in Santa Clara ($5.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: The second in a series of three storms between Jan. 18-23. Storm two occurred Jan. 19-20. Heavy rain, strong winds, and small hail were observed with this frontal system as well as lightning strikes in San Francisco.

#22. Pennsylvania

Pixabay

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 51
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $617,500 (#14 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $0.48 per 100 residents. (#13 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Crawford ($100,000 in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A cold front moved across northwestern Pennsylvania on May 29 causing showers and thunderstorms to develop. A few of the stronger storms became severe. There were many reports of large hail.

#21. Louisiana

Pixabay

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 63
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $48.1 million (#15 highest)
- Annual property damage: $103.94 per 100 residents. (#14 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2019 storm in Calcasieu ($36.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A cold front moved into the region on the 8th and stalled along the coast. Multiple strong upper-level disturbances cross the area, while the front was stalled and this produced multiple rounds of severe weather and flooding.

#20. Vermont

Michael Pereckas // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 76
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $60.1 million (#13 highest)
- Annual property damage: $930.59 per 100 residents. (#6 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2014 storm in Rutland ($75,000 in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: On the afternoon of May 27, one thunderstorm developed near Essex, New York, and proceeded to intensify as it moved southeast across a small corridor in Addison and Rutland counties. Despite the singularity of this storm, it produced widespread damage along its path, including damaging hail, winds, and urban flash flooding with the city/town of Rutland being the hardest hit. Numerous reports of golf ball size hail caused significant damage to car dealerships in/around Rutland.

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#19. Washington

Pixabay

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 83
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $7.2 million (#25 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $9.35 per 100 residents. (#22 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2014 storm in Stevens ($14,000 in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A deep trough of low pressure dropped down the Washington coastline then swung inland into the inland northwest during the afternoon of July 23. The wave took on a strong negative tilt and moved into a moist and very unstable air mass. The outcome was a widespread severe weather event for eastern Washington and northern Idaho producing large hail, flash flooding, and widespread wind damage. Large hail and heavy rain were the initial threats early in the afternoon. Late in the afternoon, the threat shifted to damaging winds with hundreds of downed or snapped trees. The hardest hit areas were northeastern Washington and northern Idaho. Falling trees led to some injuries in eastern Washington.

#18. Missouri

editrx // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 87
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $17.5 million (#21 highest)
- Annual property damage: $28.43 per 100 residents. (#21 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2016 storm in St. Charles ($4.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: As a warm front lifted north through the forecast area, thunderstorms developed. Some of the storms became severe with numerous reports of large hail, some damaging winds, and an EF2 tornado that occurred near Bourbon and Sullivan Missouri during the evening. The most costly damage occurred from a pair of supercells that dropped baseball- to softball-size hail across St. Charles County and produced severe wind gusts in St. Louis County and the city of St. Louis around the lunch hour. There were also a few reports of flash flooding with these storms.

#17. Minnesota

Jasmeet // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 87
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $19.4 million (#20 highest)
- Annual property damage: $33.96 per 100 residents. (#20 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2021 storm in Goodhue ($3.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: During the late afternoon and early evening of Thursday, June 17, thunderstorms began to develop along an outflow boundary from earlier convection across far southern Minnesota. The storms developed in an area of ample instability and wind shear of 40-50 knots across southern Minnesota, and into west-central Wisconsin. The first storm developed across northwest Le Sueur County and moved east-northeast across southern Scott and northern le Sueur counties. The city of Lonsdale received hail that measured up to 2.5 inches in diameter. Other hail between 1 inch and up to 2 inches in diameter fell along the Scott/Le Sueur County border, eastward toward northern Rice and southern Dakota counties, and into Goodhue County. Some of the storms deviated well southeast across Goodhue County and produced the largest hailstones of 3 inches in diameter near Cannon Falls. Eventually, other storms developed across southern Minnesota and moved eastward into west-central Wisconsin. There was an estimated 150 houses that were exposed to the 2-inch hail or greater. An estimated 1,000 houses were exposed to 1.5-inch hail or greater. Based on total and partial roof replacement, the total damages from this hailstorm were approximately $5.5 million dollars.

#16. Michigan

Nick Harris // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 89
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $60.8 million (#12 highest)
- Annual property damage: $60.46 per 100 residents. (#17 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2014 storm in Oakland ($6.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A powerful upper-level low-pressure system dropped southward into the Great Lakes on Sunday, July 27, sparking a good deal of severe thunderstorms in the warm, moist, and unstable air in advance of the system. Between 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., severe weather affected nearly all of southeast Michigan. The initial storm that affected portions of Midland and Bay counties from around 2:15 to 3:15 p.m. was a prolific hail producer, with hail up to 3 inches in diameter (greater than baseball size) recorded near Midland. Later, another particularly strong storm moved across Oakland County between around 4:30 and 5:15 p.m., dropping hail up to 2.5 inches in diameter (tennis ball size) near the Highland/White Lake area, with wind damage reported over central and eastern portions of the county. The storms produced heavy rainfall as well, with a swath of 1-2 (inch hail) recorded over southern Oakland County. Wyandotte, in southern Wayne County, picked up 2.67 in 4 hours. Total damage across southeast Michigan was estimated to be 100 million dollars from the severe wind and hail.

#15. Arkansas

Andrey Solovev // Shutterstock

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 120
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $3.4 million (#21 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $11.29 per 100 residents. (#24 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2020 storm in Benton ($250,000 in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: Strong to severe thunderstorms developed over northeastern Oklahoma during the morning of the 5th, as warm, moist, and unstable air was drawn northward over a warm front that stretched across the area. These storms developed into northwestern Arkansas by mid-morning. Strong instability, coupled with strong deep-layer wind shear, promoted the development of supercells that produced large hail up to five inches in diameter. Another round of thunderstorms developed across northeastern Oklahoma during the afternoon as a cold front moved into the area. These storms moved east and southeast across portions of northwestern Arkansas during the evening. The strongest storms produced large hail up to a quarter in size.

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#14. New York

Marcus Yeagley // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 132
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $2.0 million (#18 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $1.00 per 100 residents. (#16 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Tompkins ($1.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: An upper-level disturbance moved across upstate New York. With a moist and unstable air mass already in place, showers and thunderstorms developed across much of the region. Many of these storms produced hail, and in some cases, the hail was very large and produced scattered damage.

#13. New Mexico

Carl Revell // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 133
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $12.3 million (#23 highest)
- Annual property damage: $58.17 per 100 residents. (#18 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2016 storm in Lea ($3.5 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: An upper-level disturbance moved over the area and a lingering frontal boundary moved across parts of southeast New Mexico and the Permian Basin. Upper Upper-levelociated with an area of intense winds aloft moved over the region. There was good wind shear, moisture, and instability across West Texas and southeast New Mexico. Two other boundaries were moving toward the area and possibly collided with the initial boundary. These conditions combined to create good lift in the atmosphere, which resulted in widespread thunderstorms with large hail across southeast New Mexico and the Permian Basin. The wind shear created spin in the atmosphere, which allowed for tornadoes to develop in the Permian Basin and southeast New Mexico.

#12. North Carolina

Pixabay

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 139
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $126.1 million (#7 highest)
- Annual property damage: $119.50 per 100 residents. (#13 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2019 storm in Wake ($95.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A southward-moving cold front interacted with a rather unstable air mass from mid- to late morning into the early afternoon across the area and allowed for the development of an isolated cluster of thunderstorms across central Piedmont and central coastal plain of North Carolina. The cluster of thunderstorms become severe and produced wind damage, very large hail, and a EF-2 tornado as shortwave disturbance moved across the area allowing the convection to quickly intensify.

#11. Ohio

Emily Bell // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 141
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $11.1 million (#24 highest)
- Annual property damage: $9.46 per 100 residents. (#23 lowest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Summit ($5.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A cold front moved across the Upper Ohio Valley on July 4. Scattered showers and thunderstorms developed ahead of this front. A few of the stronger thunderstorms became severe. Large hail was reported over portions of Summit County. Hundreds of homes and vehicles were damaged by hail as big as tennis balls.

#10. Georgia

John Lodder // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 144
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $139.0 million (#5 highest)
- Annual property damage: $128.72 per 100 residents. (#12 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2013 storm in Henry ($9.4 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A strong upper-level system combined with a moist south-to-southeast flow, moderate instability, a cold pool aloft, and enhanced surface convergence along and ahead of an approaching cold front moving through the Deep South. This combination of parameters resulted in widespread severe weather across northwest, west central, and central Georgia including damaging winds, large hail, and a tornado. A wedge of cold air was in place across northeast Georgia, which acted to stabilize this area with only isolated reports of severe weather. The bulk of the severe weather was concentrated along a zone just to the south and west of the wedge front, where instability and low-level shear were maximized.

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#9. North Dakota

jenkinson2455 // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 149
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $87.4 million (#10 highest)
- Annual property damage: $1,128.08 per 100 residents. (#5 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2016 storm in Burleigh ($50.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A slow-moving isolated supercell developed in Morton County along a weak cold front during the evening hours in an environment with very strong instability and significant low-level moisture. The storm weakened in the late evening as additional storms moved out of southeast Montana into southwest North Dakota. The storms grew into a large bow echo that propagated northeast in a moisture-rich environment with a few supercells developing ahead of the bow. The greatest amount of damage occurred in the Bismarck area of Burleigh County, where very strong wind gusts combined with hail as large as baseballs causing extensive damage to northern portions of the city along with rural locations to the north. The strongest winds were reported in Hettinger County near Bert, where gusts to 80 mph occurred.

#8. South Dakota

Tom Beard // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 190
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $80.9 million (#11 highest)
- Annual property damage: $903.58 per 100 residents. (#7 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2013 storm in Pennington ($12.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A supercell thunderstorm developed near Piedmont and moved slowly southeastward across the Rapid City area and the eastern foothills of the Black Hills. The storm produced very large hail, which caused significant property damage from Johnson Siding and Hisega to Rapid City. The storm also spawned a very brief tornado over prairieland east of Hermosa. Runoff from the slow-moving thunderstorm caused street flooding in Rapid City and Rapid Creek to quickly rise into the greenway through town.

#7. Kansas

Paparacy // Shutterstock

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 192
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $51.5 million (#14 highest)
- Annual property damage: $175.64 per 100 residents. (#10 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2013 storm in Bourbon ($30.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A long-lived and long-tracked high precipitation supercell produced very large and damaging hail across the area.

#6. Mississippi

Pam Corey // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 288
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $565.3 million (#3 highest)
- Annual property damage: $1,916.34 per 100 residents. (#3 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2013 storm in Hinds ($200.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA (excerpted): A squall line developed across southeast Arkansas and moved quickly across north-central Mississippi … producing multiple reports of damaging winds and ping-pong to golf ball-size hail. There were reports of multiple trees blown down, some roofs blown off buildings and wind gusts of 60-80 mph ... A lone supercell moved across southeast Arkansas just after 1:00 p.m. … and continued to dive southeast across northeast Louisiana before moving into Mississippi. This storm produced multiple reports of golf ball- to baseball-size hail as it continued to dive southeast, shattering windows in homes and vehicles. [A]nother storm began to develop just to the southwest over Morehouse Parish. Ping-pong to tennis ball-size hail fell as the storm moved into northern Warren County, breaking numerous windows on vehicles near Redwood … The long-lived supercell continued to … [produce] multiple reports of golf ball- to baseball-size hail along its path as it moved into the Jackson metro area. The largest hailstone was softball size, or 4.25 inches ... This supercell continued to move southeast over the downtown Jackson metro area with numerous reports of golf ball- to baseball-size hail falling all along the path … [causing] major roof damage, shattered windshields, and dents in numerous vehicles and siding damage to multiple mobile homes in the Jackson metro area. … Reports of golf ball- to baseball-size hail were received along a line from Seminary to Natchez and a few golf ball-size hailstones fell south of Columbia. As the actual cold front finally made its way through the I-20 corridor and south, additional hail fell during the evening. However, this hail was significantly smaller than what fell earlier, with sizes ranging from nickel to quarter size. … An elementary school in Clinton was damaged bad enough to have to close for the remainder of the school year, and many state and local law enforcement vehicles were heavily damaged or totaled. … The hailstone that fell in Clinton was the third largest hailstone in March in Mississippi since 1950, only surpassed by a grapefruit-size hailstone that fell on March 30, 1993, in Puckett, and on March 6, 1996, in Laurel.

#5. South Carolina

Angela Stefanski // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 302
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $10.8 million (#26 lowest)
- Annual property damage: $20.74 per 100 residents. (#22 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2014 storm in Spartanburg ($3.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: Scattered to numerous strong to severe, discrete thunderstorm cells developed across the Piedmont during the afternoon ahead of a slow-moving, nearly stationary backdoor cold front. The storms were prolific hail producers, with some producing larger than baseball-size hail. New cells often developed upstream of mature cells, then moved over the same areas, such that some locations saw two or more rounds of large hail. This was especially true across portions of Spartanburg, Cherokee, Union, and York counties.

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#4. Oklahoma

Pamela Carl // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 386
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $464.2 million (#4 highest)
- Annual property damage: $1,164.37 per 100 residents. (#4 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Oklahoma ($250.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A surface low developed over the Texas Panhandle through the day, lifting a stationary front northward as a warm front across Oklahoma. As the surface low deepened, a potent dryline developed over western Oklahoma. Despite somewhat marginal upper-level winds for supercells, effective shear was highly supportive of sustained rotating thunderstorms which propagated east-southeastward through the afternoon. Storms began during the mid- to late afternoon over parts of north-central and northwest Oklahoma and migrated southward into the Oklahoma City metropolitan area by evening. Significant damage occurred across the Oklahoma City area due to very large hail and severe winds. A couple of brief tornadoes also occurred northwest of Oklahoma City. Total damages of $400-$500 million were estimated across the Oklahoma City metropolitan area.

#3. Nebraska

Katie Hannan // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 548
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $134.7 million (#6 highest)
- Annual property damage: $686.18 per 100 residents. (#8 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Lincoln ($30.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: A strong low-pressure system produced widespread severe weather across the central plains on April 14. Storms developed over central Nebraska in the late morning hours, which produced large hail over portions of Garfield and Wheeler counties. Around the middle of the afternoon, more storms developed over southwest Nebraska in the vicinity of a dryline and warm front as a surface low was placed over Keith and Perkins counties. These storms produced very large hail, several tornadoes, numerous funnel clouds, and heavy rain. The heaviest hit areas were across Lincoln, Logan, and Custer counties as storms continued to develop and move over these areas before finally moving east into eastern Nebraska by late evening. Although several tornadoes occurred, they were all weak and did not produce any damage. Damage from these storms was from large hail.

#2. Iowa

Lukas Jonaitis // Shutterstock

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 685
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $20.3 million (#19 highest)
- Annual property damage: $63.73 per 100 residents. (#16 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2014 storm in Adair ($10.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA (excerpted): A very dynamic pattern was in place over the state with a closed low located over southern Canada into the north-central U.S. A cold front moved into Iowa during the day and moved across the state. … Thunderstorms formed over northeast Nebraska by sunrise and continued to propagate east into Iowa. The storms intensified as they moved across the state, into a forward-moving MCS. As it strengthened into a derecho, winds of 70-80 mph were reported over a large swath of the state. All modes of severe weather occurred. Widespread wind damage was reported to trees, power lines, and structures from the high winds. In addition, very large hail occurred. Some of the larger hail included 3- to 4-inch diameter hail in Calhoun County near Rockwell City, and 3.5-inch diameter hail in Warren County at Sandyville. Several tornadoes were confirmed. Very heavy rainfall occurred with the storms. The rain lead to flooding and flash flooding in many areas of northern and central Iowa. By the end of the month, a presidential disaster declaration had been made for the following nine Iowa counties: Adams, Clarke, Decatur, Mills, Montgomery, Pottawattamie, Ringgold, Taylor, and Wayne. [The governor] also requested a disaster declaration [on July 24] for the following 26 Iowa Counties: Allamakee, Buchanan, Buena Vista, Butler, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Clay, Dickinson, Emmet, Fayette, Franklin, Hancock, Humboldt, Ida, Kossuth, Lyon, Osceola, Palo Alto, Plymouth, Pocahontas, Sac, Sioux, Winnebago, Winneshiek, Woodbury, and Wright.

#1. Texas

Ian Wajand // Flickr

- Total hailstorms, 2012-2021: 1,243
- Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $6.5 billion (#1 highest)
- Annual property damage: $2,207.73 per 100 residents. (#1 highest)
- Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Dallas ($900.0 million in property damage)
- Event description from NOAA: Four supercells produced a record-setting hail event and one tornado across parts of North Texas. Two of the four supercells tracked through Dallas County causing over a billion dollars in hail damage. The hail in Dallas County ranged in sizes up to 3 inches in diameter. In many areas, the hail lasted for at least 30 minutes. Tens of thousands of cars were damaged by the hail, windows were shattered, roofs were damaged, and trees were shredded of their leaves. The Lakewood area of Dallas was one of the hardest hit areas. Part of the Lakewood Theater was damaged, and thousands of divots damaged the golf course at the Lakewood Country Club. Historic homes on Swiss Avenue sustained significant roof damage with roof repairs on a few homes estimated over $100,000. A glass exhibit at the Dallas Arboretum sustained damage that was described as relatively minor. This supercell continued to track into Ellis County producing hail damage down to Midlothian. The second supercell in Dallas County tracked from Irving into Cedar Hill. Another supercell produced an EF-0 tornado, 70-95 mph downburst winds, and softball-sized hail in Fannin County. The fourth supercell produced hail up to 3.25 inches in diameter in Collin County. Damage estimates were estimated as high as $2 billion dollars for this event, but insurance companies anticipated the final damage total to be around $1.1 billion. One head injury was reported when the hail broke through the sunroof of a car.